Frank Mosley

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Frank Mosley has been called "a superb actor and filmmaker" (RogerEbert.com), "an indie hard-hitter" (The Playlist), and "the kind of experimentalist we don't see often enough...with a pair of soulful eyes behind which there always seems to be something going on" (Keyframe). He is an alumnus of the 2015 Berlinale Talents, a participant of the 2017 NYFF Artist Academy, and a graduate of Black Factory Cinema's 2016 Auteur Workshop, led by the late Abbas Kiarostami in San Antonio de los Banos, Cuba. He’s worked on films shot in locations as diverse as NYC, Cuba, China, Los Angeles, and London. His performances have been seen at festivals such as Cannes Semaine de la Critique, Sundance, Berlinale, SXSW, New Directors/New Films, AFI, Viennale, BAMcinemafest, Slamdance, and the American Film Festival in Wroclaw. He’s appeared in five films at Sundance (including 2013’s Special Jury Prize winner Upstream Color by Shane Carruth and 2016’s U.S. Short Fiction Special Jury Prize winner, The Procedure by Calvin Reeder), and appeared in over a dozen films that played SXSW (including 2018 Grand Jury Prize winner Thunder Road by Jim Cummings). He is the recipient of Fort Worth Weekly’s annual Visionary Award in 2013, won the Independent Visions Special Jury Prize for Outstanding Performance for his leading role in Some Beasts at the 2016 Sarasota Film Festival, and a special jury prize for Best Supporting Actor at the 2019 St. Louis Filmmaker's Showcase for his role in The Ghost Who Walks. He's acted in other films such as Mario Furloni and Kate McClean's hybrid doc Freeland, Daniel Patrick Carbone's segment in the omnibus feature Collective Unconscious, legend Jon Jost's final narrative film They Had It Coming, Zachary Shedd's neo-noir Americana, Dustin Guy Defa's Person to Person, Rooster Teeth's series "Day 5", Anthony Brownrigg's cult sequel Don't Look in the Basement 2, and Justin D. Hilliard's The Other Side of Paradise.


PRESS (selected):
“A superb actor and filmmaker.”
-Matt Fagerholm, RogerEbert.com

“An indie hard-hitter.”
-Christopher Jason Bell, The Playlist

"Thoughtful, approachable, and unpretentiously curious about the nature of motion-picture artifice, he’s the sort of experimentalist we don’t see often enough. Possibly Mosley’s best asset, performance- wise, is a pair of soulful eyes, behind which there always seems to be something going on.”
-Jonathan Kiefer, Keyframe

“It is precisely Mosley’s kind of forward thinking and blending of the arts that makes him stand out on the independent film scene.”
-Jessica Tomberlin, Dallas CultureMap

“Bearded and slight of stature, friendly but intense, the young actor/filmmaker has quietly emerged as a sort of John Cassavetes of North Texas. In the couple of dozen features, shorts, and web series he’s performed in since 2004, Mosley has blossomed into an impressive character actor, playing everything from a comical hip-hop pimp (the TV show Ghostbreakers) to a hostile, obsessive college professor (Clay Liford’s feature Wuss) to a callow young businessman who loses his naïvete during a business lunch (Eric Steele’s short Cork’s Cattlebaron).”
-Jimmy Fowler, Fort Worth Weekly

ON HIS PERFORMANCE IN THE OTHER SIDE OF PARADISE:
“An appealing performance with intriguing elements of depth.” -Frank Scheck, The Hollywood Reporter

“Mosley seemingly channels Stanley Tucci in providing his unsmiling, shaven-headed character with a potent dose of sexual chutzpah.”
-Ronnie Scheib, Variety

“He induces simultaneous states of humor, menace, intrigue, and sexual bravado.”
-Don Simpson, Smells Like Screen Spirit

“All the actors are perfect for their roles. Frank Mosley, who plays Jamie, may be the more quiet member of the main trio, but he sells the character in every single scene. He doesn’t have to say much, because he’s the epitome of cool. The guy doesn’t look like a hardened criminal, but his charisma and the way he carries himself in the film makes you believe it – and the spectacular way that he’s written just makes you love this guy from beginning to end.”
-Josh Samford, Rogue Cinema

ON HIS PERFORMANCE IN AMERICANA:
“Frank Mosley turns in his best performance yet as the starlet’s bitter husband, steeping the film in dramatic authenticity. That, along with the film’s haunting imagery and soundtrack, make for a mystery as hard to forget as it is to unravel.”
-Bears Fonte, AM/FM Magazine

“The Austin-based actor first blipped on our radar last year with Zachary Shedd’s paranoid-
thriller Americana, where he plays a grieving husband whose starlet wife (Kelli Garner) is gunned down by a crazy loon at her movie premiere afterparty. His robust on-screen presence gave us pause and we delved deeper into his past acting work. There’s someone like Mosley in every professional network: a prolific Energizer Bunny of outwardly untamed ambitions. His output is sprawling. And if he weren’t such a stand-up guy, we’d wager it might be annoying—our exacerbated insecurities spawning a multitude of questions like, “Why don’t I beat my drum with that kind of aspiration?” Or worse, “Where is my drum?”
-Kee Chang, Anthem Magazine

ON HIS PERFORMANCE IN SOME BEASTS:
“One of his best performances to date.”
-Michael McWay, Hammer To Nail

“A subtle, quiet miracle. A career-making performance with physical choices that leap off the screen.” -Rachel Gibson Shepherd, Truth on Cinema

“One of the best male performances of 2017. Anchoring the film is the central performance from Frank Mosley, converting the meager dialogue into a subtle showcase of expressions and body language with exhales of breath becoming his main delivery mode of emotion and sentiment, expressed through the strained inability to develop and deliver the words necessary; the more emotional segments of his portrayal consist of lines that remain incomplete and malformed like a mass of knotted tendrils ensnared deep within his chest; a simple, exacerbated breath communicating all you need to know, effectively filling the silences of Nelson’s screenplay.”
-Kevin Rakestraw, Film Pulse

ON HIS PERFORMANCE IN CORK’S CATTLEBARON:
“Initially, Mosley’s role seems like an easy one, though it gradually reveals itself to be the trickiest, for he has to sit there for the majority of this film’s 15 minutes in silence and absorb the obnoxiousness. Mosley underplays things perfectly, to the point where we know that when he finally speaks, it’s going to bode very unwell for Brady (Robert Longstreet). Death of a salesman, indeed.”
-Michael Tully, Hammer To Nail

ON HIS PARTICIPATION IN UPSTREAM COLOR:
“With its labyrinthine, cerebral plot, challenging structure and its complex sound design, it was easy to become too impressed or overwhelmed by the film’s aesthetics and miss out on the fact that it featured one of the best ensembles of the year.”
-Jose Solis, Pop Matters

ON HIS ROLE IN SHOOT THE MOON RIGHT BETWEEN THE EYES:
"...with a very funny performance by Frank Mosley."
-Sheila O'Malley, RogerEbert.com

ON HIS PERFORMANCE IN DON’T EVER CHANGE:
“I can’t not mention the witty performance given by the handsome Frank Mosley, who portrayed Jason. He was very hard hitting in this short (no pun intended).”
-Lacy Lou, PopHorror.com

“Indy favourite Mosley is in top form as the overreaching fan, who doesn't quite know what he's getting into.”
-Amber Wilkinson, Eye For Film

“Frank Mosley is fantastic as Jason, who has ulterior motives for his visit. It wouldn’t be fair to reveal anything more about his character, but Mosley dives into things with relish and aplomb. He and Cyndi Williams play off of each other marvelously, giving Don’t Ever Change a huge amount of verve.”
-Joseph Perry, Gruesome Magazine

ON HIS PERFORMANCE IN SUBURBANITE:
“With that being said, my favorite performance comes from Frank Mosley who plays the corrupt cop/ con artist. His performance is pretty intense and he really brings the drama to each scene he is in. He is a very charismatic villain and I love that.”
-Blacktooth, Horror Society

“Enter into the equation Rick, a con man, fake assassin, and perhaps a very dirty cop (although the last part suggested), played exceptionally well by Frank Mosley. Mosley steals the scenes, a young version of Christian Bale, his mannerisms and delivery fitting perfectly into the film.”
-Baron Craze, Rogue Cinema

ON HIS PARTICIPATION IN THEY HAD IT COMING:
“As for the monologues, they're frequently hypnotic; Jost and Eckard create a rhythmic, minimalist poetry from the nuances of regional speech, and the actors deliver their lines as though performing pieces of music.”
-Ben Sachs, Cine-File

“Made on a true micro-budget, this film shines with fantastic performances and rigorous and beautifully
stark images.”
-Ana Wright, Chicago Filmmakers

ON HIS PERFORMANCE IN “DON’T LOOK IN THE BASEMENT 2”:
“I also really liked Frank Mosley as the shady and unstable Dr. Lance and thought that he turned in an awesome performance as well as you can’t help but dislike the guy due to his actions and overall personality.”
-Todd Martin, HorrorNews.net

“Performances are generally strong throughout, with a standout showing coming from Mosley as the seemingly unraveling Dr. White.”
-Horror And Sons

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